Thursday, June 1, 2017

Smart Composition Strategies Part 1

Smart compositions give students an advantage in the IELTS training courses. This is the reason coaching sessions in the IELTS center can ensure that individuals are well-versed in English conversations. Note that classes in the IELTS training vary depending on the packages that students availed.

ielts writing

Despite this diversity in subject scope, IELTS training courses guarantee that students are equipped with English language proficiency needed to achieve their band score goal. The facilities and learning materials in the IELTS center are guaranteed functional and up-to-date to ensure optimal knowledge and skills acquisition.

Distinguish sentences clearly from clause and phrase to help you develop smart English sentences.

CLAUSE


The clause is the basic unit of English grammar and is composed of at least a subject and a verb. It has four types.

 1.    Main/ Independent Clause expresses a complete thought. Note that a sentence must have at least one main clause. Otherwise, it becomes a fragment. It follows this pattern:

SUBJECT    +    VERB   =   COMPLETE THOUGHT

Example:   
                 The student         +             learned       =     The student learned
                      Subject                            Verb

2.    Subordinate Clause does not communicate a complete thought. Thus, it must be connected to the main clause.  It follows this pattern:

SUBORDINATE CONJUNCTION   +   SUBJECT   +   VERB  =   INCOMPLETE THOUGHT

Example:   
                  As          +                the instructor    +     reads    =    As the instructor reads
  Subordinate conjunction               Subject               Verb

3.    Relative Clause starts with a relative pronoun (i.e. who, whom, whose, which, that) or a relative adverb (i.e. when, where, why). This type also does not express a complete thought so it must be attached to the main clause. It follows this pattern:

RELATIVE PRONOUN OR ADVERB      +     SUBJECT   +    VERB    =    INCOMPLETE THOUGHT

Example:   
                Whom        +      the instructor    +   applauded    =   Whom the instructor applauded
           Relative pronoun          Subject                 Verb

               Where          +       the student    +     set             =    Where the student set
       Relative adverb                Subject           Verb


4.    Noun Clause pertains to any clause that functions as a noun. Replacing a noun with a clause gives a noun clause.
Example:
                You have to know more about the IELTS Reading Component.
                                                                                            Noun

                You have to know more about what the instructor is discussing.
                                                                                           Noun clause
 
Learning the appropriate application of clauses helps improve the quality of your writing and develop your ability to communicate with other people especially in English-speaking countries. Avoid grammar and sentence structure error with accurately constructed sentences.



 

REFERENCES:
  • "Clause, phrase and sentence." Learn English | British Council. Accessed March 20, 2017. http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/clause-phrase-and-sentence.
  • "How to Write Better by Improving Your Sentence Structure - Video & Lesson Transcript." Study.com. Accessed March 21, 2017. http://study.com/academy/lesson/how-to-write-better-by-improving-your-sentence-structure.html.
  • "5 tips to make constructing English sentences easy." Global Blog – Explore our learning resources. August 24, 2016. Accessed March 21, 2017. https://englishlive.ef.com/blog/5-tips-make-constructing-english-sentences-easy/.
  • "The Four Commandments of Writing Good Sentences." WritersDigest.com. July 20, 2011. Accessed March 21, 2017. http://www.writersdigest.com/writing-articles/by-writing-goal/business-legal-matters/sentence-sleuth-0608.
  • Simmons, Robin L. "The Clause." Grammar Bytes! :: The Clause. Accessed March 21, 2017. http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/clause.htm.

0 comments:

Post a Comment